Commentary on Hanuman Chalisa verses 23 & 24

Visit Hindu Perspective’s HANUMAN SECTION (special feature) for explanations to the other verses of the Hanuman Chalisa.

Ram duware tum Rakhavare / Hot na aagya bin paisare

You are the (ever vigilant) Guard at the door of Sri Rama’s abode. No entrance is possible without your consent.

Sab such lahe tumhare saran / Tum rakshak kaahu ko darnaa

Taking all refuge with you one can enjoy all happiness. Anybody living under your protection need to have no fear.

Hanuman Chalisa, verses 23 & 24

You are the (ever vigilant) Guard at the door of Sri Rama’s abode. No entrance is possible without your consent.

Rama represents the aspect of the Divine which protects, illumines and gives that peace which passes all understanding. The name of Rama as a mantra is called “taraka” – that which destroys all impurities and crosses one over the ocean of birth and death towards the shores of true illumination and enlightenment.

To ascend to the experience of Rama, the highest states of spiritual illumination, the grace and qualities of Hanuman are needed. Without cultivating these qualities, entry is not possible.

The correct preparation is needed for the highest spiritual experiences (Samadhi) – without the necessary self purification and preparation, any spiritual experience will be lower in nature, in which ego and desires are magnified. Therefore in Yoga, we have the importance of the Yamas and Niyamas. Hanuman is the epitome of the Yamas and Niyamas.

The Yamas are foundational ethical and lifestyle principles that allow true spirituality practice to proceed. They are also a factor in good health and freedom from disease, particularly at the level of the mind. They are as follows:

  • Ahimsa – non-harming (it should be noted that true Ahimsa does not preclude fighting tyranny or force used for self-defence or defence of others)
  • Satya – truthfulness
  • Brahmacharya – control of sexual energy
  • Asteya – non-stealing
  • Aparigraha – negation of jealousy and envy within us

The Niyamas are yogic lifestyle disciplines or observances, and are as follows:

  • Saucha – cleanliness / purity
  • Santosha – contentment
  • Tapas – self discipline
  • Svadhyaya – self study
  • Isvara-pranidhana – surrender to the Divine

Hanuman is the greatest example of these qualities. It is said that he is perhaps the greatest of Yogis. It is believed by many that Hanuman as a Yogi decided to keep his separate identity of his soul rather than merge into the infinite, so that he can keep on guiding those who call out to Him or to Rama. 

Taking all refuge with you one can enjoy all happiness. Anybody living under your protection need to have no fear.

It is said that through Hanuman’s grace, one can gain all peace, pleasure & wellbeing. Part of the reason for this is that through determination, dedication and devotion which he grants – anything is possible. It is also because invoking him, many of our inappropriate desires disappear and we are left with the desires which are true to our inner nature.

Hanuman understands that we are all at  different stages in our spiritual development, and not everyone is ready to forego all pleasures and attachments in a single minded pursuit of the Divine. Therefore those who seek his grace are given protection and aid, being helped to achieve their genuine wishes & highest potentials – such as Sugriva and Vibhishana. He is a form of the Divine who safeguards one’s material life as well as helping to travel towards the Divine. He is also considered a very fierce protector of his devotees. All across India and beyond people invoke Hanuman to protect them against calamities, dangers and difficulties of all types.

As well as the unexplainable peace of mind that chanting the Hanuman Chalisa grants, which gives one the inner strength to overcome fear and danger, there is a definite flow of grace which is sometimes tangible and even miraculous.

It is said that the Hanuman Chalisa was actually composed by Tulsidas in prison, when the Mughal Emperor Akbar had him imprisoned. This occurred because of news that Tulsidas had brought a dead person back to life. Akbar asked Tulsidas to come to his court, and refused as he was busy composing his devotional poetry. Akbar had him forcibly brought to the court and asked him to perform a miracle. Tulsidas said that he did not have any powers or perform miracles, and that he only knew Rama. The Emperor imprisoned Tulsidas at Fatehpur Sikri, “We will see this Rama.” In prison, Tulsidas composed the Hanuman Chalisa and kept chanting it. It is said that on the 40th day of chanting, many monkeys entered the town and caused havoc. They interfered with all aspects of everyday life entering each home and even the emperor’s harem, scratching people and throwing bricks from ramparts. An old Hafiz told the emperor that this was the miracle of the imprisoned Fakir. The Emperor had Tulsidas released and asked for his forgiveness, ordering that followers of Rama and Hanuman should not be harassed.

Visit Hindu Perspective’s HANUMAN SECTION (special feature) for explanations to the other verses of the Hanuman Chalisa.

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